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Research Article Advance Publication

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1307703

Daily Mean Temperature and Clinical Kidney Stone Presentation in Five U.S. Metropolitan Areas: A Time-Series Analysis

Gregory E. Tasian,1,2,3 Jose E. Pulido,2 Antonio Gasparrini,4 Christopher S. Saigal,5,6 Benjamin P. Horton,7,8 J. Richard Landis,9 Rodger Madison,6 and Ron Keren3,9,10 for the Urologic Diseases in America Project
Author Affiliations close
1Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; 2Perelman School of Medicine at The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; 3Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; 4Department of Medical Statistics, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England; 5Department of Urology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; 6RAND Corporation; Santa Monica, California, USA; 7Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University; New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA; 8 Division of Earth Sciences and Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, 639798, Singapore; 9Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine at The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; 10Department of Pediatrics The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
About This Article open

This EHP Advance Publication article has been peer-reviewed, revised, and accepted for publication. EHP Advance Publication articles are completely citable using the DOI number assigned to the article. This document will be replaced with the copyedited and formatted version as soon as it is available. Through the DOI number used in the citation, you will be able to access this document at each stage of the publication process.

Citation: Tasian GE, Pulido JE, Gasparrini A, Saigal CS, Horton BP, Landis JR, Madison R, Keren R for the Urologic Diseases in America Project. Daily Mean Temperature and Clinical Kidney Stone Presentation in Five U.S. Metropolitan Areas: A Time-Series Analysis. Environ Health Perspect; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307703.

Received: 26 September 2013
Accepted: 11 June 2014
Advance Publication: 10 July 2014

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Abstract

Background: High ambient temperatures are a risk factor for nephrolithiasis, but the precise relationship between temperature and kidney stone presentation is unknown.

Objectives: Our objective was to estimate associations between mean daily temperature and kidney stone presentation according to lag time and temperatures.

Methods: Using a time series design and distributed lag non-linear models, we estimated the relative risk (RR) of kidney stone presentation associated with mean daily temperatures, including cumulative RR for a 20-day period, and RR for individual daily lags through 20 days. Our analysis used MarketScan data for 60,433 patients who presented for evaluation or treatment of kidney stones from 2005–2011 in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia.

Results: Associations between mean daily temperature and kidney stone presentation were not monotonic, and there was variation in the exposure-response curve shapes and the strength of associations at different temperatures. However, in most cases RRs increased for temperatures above the reference value of 10°C. The cumulative RR for a daily mean temperature of 30°C versus 10°C was 1.38 in Atlanta (95% CI: 1.07, 1.79), 1.37 in Chicago (95% CI: 1.07, 1.76), 1.36 in Dallas (95% CI: 1.10, 1.69), 1.11 in Los Angeles (95% CI: 0.73, 1.68), and 1.47 in Philadelphia (95% CI: 1.00, 2.17). Kidney stone presentations also were positively associated with temperatures < 2°C in Atlanta, and < 10°C in Chicago and Philadelphia. In 4 cities, the strongest association between kidney stone presentation and a daily mean temperature of 30 versus 10°C was estimated for lags ≤ 3 days.

Conclusions: In general, kidney stone presentations increased with higher daily mean temperatures, with the strongest associations estimated for lags of only a few days. These findings further support an adverse effect of high temperatures on nephrolithiasis.


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