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Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP291

Neonatal Cord Blood Oxylipins and Exposure to Particulate Matter in the Early-Life Environment: An ENVIRONAGE Birth Cohort Study

Dries S. Martens,1 Sandra Gouveia,2 Narjes Madhloum,1 Bram G. Janssen,1 Michelle Plusquin,1,3 Charlotte Vanpoucke,4 Wouter Lefebvre,5 Bertil Forsberg,6 Malin Nording,2 and Tim S. Nawrot1,7
Author Affiliations open
1Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium; 2Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå, Sweden; 3MRC/PHE Centre for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, W2 1PG London, England; 4Belgian Interregional Environment Agency, 1210 Brussels, Belgium; 5Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), 2400 Mol, Belgium; 6Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå, Sweden; 7Department of Public Health & Primary Care, Leuven University, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

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  • Background: As part of the lipidome, oxylipins are bioactive lipid compounds originating from oxidation of different fatty acids. Oxylipins could provide a new target in the developmental origins model or the ability of early life exposure to change biology.

    Objectives: We studied the association between in utero PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5µm) exposure and oxylipin profiles in newborns.

    Methods: Thirty-seven oxylipins reflecting the cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (5-LOX and 12/15-LOX) and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways were assayed in 197 cord blood plasma samples from the ENVIRONAGE birth cohort. Principal component (PC) analysis and multiple regression models were used to estimate associations of in utero PM2.5 exposure with oxylipin pathways and individual metabolites.

    Results: A principal component representing the 5-LOX pathway (6 metabolites) was significantly positively associated with PM2.5 exposure during the entire (multiple testing-adjusted q-value = 0.05) and second trimester of pregnancy (q = 0.05). A principal component representing the 12/15-LOX pathway (11 metabolites) was positively associated with PM2.5 exposure during the second trimester of pregnancy (q = 0.05). PM2.5 was not significantly associated with the COX pathway during any time period. There was a positive but non-significant association between second trimester PM2.5 and the CYP pathway (q = 0.16).

    Conclusion: In utero exposure to particulate matter, particularly during the second trimester, was associated with differences in the cord blood levels of metabolites derived from the lipoxygenase pathways. These differences may indicate an effect of air pollution during in utero life on the inflammatory state of the newborn at birth. Oxylipins may be important mediators between early life exposures and health outcomes later in life.

  • This EHP Advance Publication article has been peer-reviewed, revised, and accepted for publication. EHP Advance Publication articles are completely citable using the DOI number assigned to the article. This document will be replaced with the copyedited and formatted version as soon as it is available. Through the DOI number used in the citation, you will be able to access this document at each stage of the publication process.

    Citation: Martens DS, Gouveia S, Madhloum N, Janssen BG, Plusquin M, Vanpoucke C, Lefebvre W, Forsberg B, Nording M, Nawrot TS. Neonatal Cord Blood Oxylipins and Exposure to Particulate Matter in the Early-Life Environment: An ENVIRONAGE Birth Cohort Study. Environ Health Perspect; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP291

    Received: 8 December 2015
    Revised: 1 October 2016
    Accepted: 8 October 2016
    Published: 4 November 2016

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