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Abstract
24 September 2018
ISES-ISEE 2018 Joint Annual Meeting: Addressing Complex Local and Global Issues in Environmental Exposure and Health

Associations between Ambient Ozone and Fine Particulate Matter Exposures and Autism Spectrum Disorder in Metropolitan Cincinnati, Ohio

Publication: ISEE Conference Abstracts
Volume 2018, Issue 1

Abstract

Epidemiological studies have found fairly consistent associations between various air pollution measures and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) for prenatal and postnatal exposures. We examined associations between ASD and ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone concentrations during pregnancy through the 2nd year of life in a study of 428 ASD cases diagnosed at a large regional children’s hospital in metropolitan Cincinnati, Ohio, frequency matched (15:1) on birth year to 6420 controls from Ohio birth records. We assigned daily PM2.5 and ozone estimates from US EPA’s Fused Air Quality Surfaces Using Downscaling model to each subject for each day of the study period (2005-2012) based on the census tract of the mother’s residence at birth. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (aORs) with logistic regression models using continuous and categorical exposure period averages while adjusting for a priori confounders, other air pollutants, and multiple time windows of exposure. In the multipollutant models comparing highest to lowest sextiles, we detected elevated aORs for PM2.5 in the 2nd trimester (aOR=1.41, 95% CI: 0.89, 2.24), 1st year of life (aOR=1.54, 95% CI: 0.98, 2.40), and cumulative period from pregnancy through the 2nd year of life (aOR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.00, 2.31), and for ozone in the 2nd year of life (aOR=1.29, 95% CI: 0.81, 2.05). When restricting to male sex, a strong risk factor for ASD, results increased for 3rd trimester PM2.5 (aOR=1.36, 95% CI: 0.82, 2.25) and the cumulative period from pregnancy through the 2nd year (aOR=1.72, 95% CI: 1.08, 2.76). Though we saw limited evidence of exposure-response relationships, the elevated aORs for PM2.5 in the upper exposure groups were similar in magnitude to those reported in previous studies. We did not see a consistent pattern of sensitive exposure periods between the two pollutants, but our strongest results for postnatal exposures agree with some previous research.

Information & Authors

Information

Published In

ISEE Conference Abstracts
Volume 2018Issue 124 September 2018

History

Published online: 24 September 2018

Keyword

  1. Ambient Air Pollution - Neurological & Neurobehavioral Changes (children)

Authors

Affiliations

Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, [email protected]
US EPA, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, [email protected]
US EPA, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, [email protected]
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, [email protected]
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, [email protected]
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, [email protected]

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