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Abstracts
24 September 2018
ISES-ISEE 2018 Joint Annual Meeting: Addressing Complex Local and Global Issues in Environmental Exposure and Health

Study on the Relationship between Air Pollution and Insulin Resistance Based on Branched-Chain Amino Acids Analysis

Publication: ISEE Conference Abstracts
Volume 2018, Issue 1

Abstract

Background: Studies showed associations between air pollution exposure and the incidence of diabetes; however, the evidence on the underlying mechanism is limited. Insulin resistance (IR) has been recognized as an important pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes. There were studies found that the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), including leucine, isoleucine, and valine, could affect the sensitivity of insulin. And it also shown that exposure to air pollution, e.g. ozone, could increase BCAAs’ levels in blood. Therefore, we may assume exposure to air pollution has effects on the insulin resistance through the mediation of BCAAs.Method: To examine this hypothesis, we measured BCAAs in serum samples of 120 subjects from an existing panel study (SCOPE). 130 observations from 83 subjects (37 with pre-diabetes, 46 with normal fast glucose level) were included in this preliminary analysis. Serum BCAAs were analyzed by using a UPLC-QQQ-MS. The associations among BCAAs, IR and air pollution exposure were analyzed using Mixed-effects models.Results: The average (± SD) concentrations of leucine, isoleucine and valine in serum were 148.6±33.0 µM, 70.7±19.1 µM, and 247.0±54.9 µM, respectively. We found a significantly higher level of the total BCAAs (combined three BCAAs together) in subjects with pre-diabetes than healthy ones with p = 0.004. Three individual and the total BCAAs were statistically significantly associated with HOMA-IR which is an indicator of insulin resistance with p < 0.042. We did not observe statistically significant associations between BCAAs and PM2.5 or ozone in this preliminary analysis, but valine showed a marginally significant association with ozone (p = 0.052).Tentative conclusion: The significant associations observed between BCAAs and insulin resistance from the preliminary analysis suggest BCAAs a potential mediator of insulin resistance. More data are needed to examine the associations between BCAAs and air pollutants.

Information & Authors

Information

Published In

ISEE Conference Abstracts
Volume 2018Issue 124 September 2018

History

Published online: 24 September 2018

Keywords

  1. Air pollution
  2. Biomarkers/Biomonitoring/Exposome
  3. Epidemiology
  4. Ozone

Authors

Affiliations

College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China, [email protected]
Environmental Research Group, MRC PHE Centre for Environment and Health, King‘s College London, London, United Kingdom, [email protected]
National Institute of Environmental Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China, [email protected]
SKL-ESPC and BIC-ESAT, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China, [email protected]
College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China, [email protected]
College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China, [email protected]
Peking University Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, China, [email protected]
Peking University Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, China, [email protected]
SKL-ESPC and BIC-ESAT, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China, [email protected]
SKL-ESPC and BIC-ESAT, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China, [email protected]

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