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2017 Conference

Abstract Number: 276 | ID: 2017-276

Diurnal Variation of Transportation Noise Exposure and Cardiovascular Mortality in Switzerland

Danielle Vienneau(Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Switzerland and University of Basel, Switzerland, danielle.vienneau@unibas.ch), Harris Héritier(Tropical and Public Health Institute, Switzerland and University of Basel, Switzerland), Maria Foraster(Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Switzerland; University of Basel, Switzerland), Ikenna C. Eze(Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Switzerland and University of Basel, Switzerland), Emmanuel Schaffner(Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Switzerland adn University of Basel, Switzerland), Mark Brink(Federal Office for the Environment, Switzerland), Christian Cajochen(Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Switzerland), Jean Marc Wunderli(Empa, Laboratory for Acoustics/Noise control, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Switzerland), Nicole Probst-Hensch(Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Switzerland and University of Basel, Switzerland), Martin Röösli(Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Switzerland and University of Basel, Switzerland)
Background/Aim: Most studies investigating the long term health effects of noise consider 24-hour, day or night average noise exposure levels. We aimed to analyse the impact of noise exposure at specific time windows on cardiovascular mortality.
Methods: Within the SiRENE (Short and Long Term Effects of Transportation Noise Exposure) project we generated Switzerland-wide exposure models for road traffic, railway and aircraft noise in 2001 for different time windows. Specific windows included: 07-19h; 19-23h; 23-01h; 01-05h; 05-06h; and 06-07h. Combined-source noise exposure levels at the most exposed residential façade were assigned to each of the 4.41 million adults in the Swiss National Cohort. Hazard ratios (HR) of noise effects on various cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths as primary cause were computed by Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounders and NO2 levels.
Results: During follow up (2000-2008), there were 142,955 deaths from CVD, of which 42.2%, 15.7%, 9.4%, 8.6% were from ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke, blood-pressure related (BP) and heart failure. For most outcomes we observed a distinct diurnal pattern. For IHD the highest HR was observed for the core night hours from 01-05h (normalized HR per standard deviation of noise exposure: 1.023, 95% CI: 1.014-1.033) and lower HR for the daytime 07-19h (1.018 [1.009-1.028]). For heart failure daytime noise exposure yielded the highest HR (1.047 [1.027-1.068]).
Conclusions: While nocturnal noise exposure tended to be more relevant than daytime exposure for acute CVD mortality, the opposite was found for chronic conditions such as heart failure. Our results thus indicate that different mechanisms are at play in the aetiology of noise induced cardiovascular deaths. In particular, it suggests sleep is an important mediator for long term health consequences of transportation noise for acute CVD.