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2017 Conference

Abstract Number: 474 | ID: 2017-474

Occupational Noise Exposure and the Incidence of Hypertension: A Prospective Cohort Study

Tai-Wei Chen(Department of Occupational Safety and Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taiwan, u102014412@cmu.edu.tw), Jing-Huei Chen(Department of Occupational Safety and Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taiwan), Yu-Ting Lin(Department of Occupational Safety and Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taiwan), Kang-Yin Cheng(Department of Occupational Safety and Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taiwan), Bing-Fang Hwang(Department of Occupational Safety and Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taiwan)
Background/Aim: Exposure to occupational noise might increase the risk of hypertension. However, there is limited cohort studies to address the occupational noise exposure may change over time.
Methods: We conducted a 30-years cohort study including 1467 workers in aircraft industry. The cumulated noise exposure levels were calculated by using time-weighted average exposure ( ). The effect estimates were presented as hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals of hypertension, adjusting for potential confounders. We further classified the cumulated noise exposure level as four categories, the reference level (<70dBA-year), low (70-79dBA-year), medium (80-89dBA-year) and high exposure (>=90dBA-year).
Results: In Cox proportional model adjusting for confounders, we found the association of noise exposure and hypertension. Comparing with the reference group (<70 dBA-year), the hazard risk of hypertension was related to medium (adjusted HR=2.00, 95%CI=1.34-2.96) and high exposure (adjusted HR=2.60, 95%CI=1.55-4.36) during 3-30 years.
Conclusions: Our study suggests that long term exposure to nose over 80 dBA-year during 3-30 years may increase the risk of development of hypertension.