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2017 Conference

Abstract Number: 532 | ID: 2017-532

Green Space, Noise and Air Pollution and Mortality in Barcelona

Mark Nieuwenhuijsen(Barcelona Institute for Global Health Campus MAR, Barcelona Biomedical Research Park, Spain, mark.nieuwenhuijsen@isglobal.org), Mireia Gascon(Barcelona Institute for Global Health Campus MAR, Barcelona Biomedical Research Park, Spain), David Martinez(Barcelona Institute for Global Health Campus MAR, Barcelona Biomedical Research Park, Spain), Marta Cirach(Barcelona Institute for Global Health Campus MAR, Barcelona Biomedical Research Park, Spain), Xavier Basagaña(Barcelona Institute for Global Health Campus MAR, Barcelona Biomedical Research Park, Spain)
Background/Aim: Relatively few studies have evaluated simultaneously the relationship between green space, air pollution and noise and mortality in urban setting We conducted a study to evaluate the relationship between green space, noise and air pollution and all cause mortality in Barcelona using a large patient database with individual level mortality and covariate data.
Methods: Both men and women of 18 years and above registered on January 1 2010 by the Sistema d'Informació pel Desenvolupament de la Investigació en Atenció Primària (SIDIAP) were included in the cohort and followed up until 31 December 2014 or until death. SIDIAP is a primary care computerized medical records of a representative sample of 0.8 million people in Barcelona. We used different definitions of green space (greenness and access to green space), noise maps and air pollution estimates from land use regression modeling. From the SIDIAP database we extracted Individual level covariate data such as age, gender, country of origin, smoking status, and BMI. For each year of study on a census track level we also obtained MEDEA social economic status (SES), urbanity level, and built environment measures. We used Cox proportional hazards regres¬sion models [hazard ratios (HRs)] with time-dependent exposures and age as the time scale to estimate associations between green space, noise and air pollution and all cause mortality.
Results: Initial results show independent effects of the exposures with an increase in mortality with increasing levels of noise and air pollution and a decrease in in mortality with increasing levels of green space. Risk estimates were similar to previous studies where only one exposure was examined.
Conclusions: The study provides evidence for policy making, specifically for urban planning and management, environment and health.