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2017 Conference

Abstract Number: 743 | ID: 2017-743

Urban Residential Greenness and Adiposity: A Longitudinal Cohort Study in Stockholm County

Åsa Persson(Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Sweden, asa.persson@ki.se), Charlotta Eriksson(Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Sweden), Tom Bellander(Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Sweden), Tomas Lind(Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Sweden), Göran Pershagen(Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Sweden), Andrei Pyko(Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Sweden), Mare Lõhmus(Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Sweden)
Background/Aim: This longitudinal cohort study, using objectively measured exposure and outcomes, aims to explore the association between residential green space and body fat distribution, potentially mediated via psycho-endocrine mechanisms.
Methods: Based on the Stockholm Diabetes Prevention Program (SDPP), this study included 5 355 subjects from Stockholm County aged 35-56 years at recruitment in 1992-1994, and followed up 2002-2006. We defined surrounding greenness as a time-weighted average of satellite-based Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) at 30 m×30 m resolution during 1990-2015 in buffers of 100 m, 250 m, and 500 m around participants’ place of residence. Multiple linear regressions with adjustment for potential confounders at individual and contextual level, including behavioural, socio-economic and environmental factors (traffic-related air pollution and noise), were used to estimate the change in BMI, waist circumference and waist-hip ratio.
Results: Waist circumference increased on average by 0.51 cm/year in this population, and time-weighted NDVI in 500 m buffers ranged 0.2-0.7. Higher levels of surrounding greenness were associated with reduced increase in waist circumference, with 0.78 cm less increase in waist circumference per year for one unit difference in NDVI, (95% CI 0.16-1.41). This is equivalent to an average annual increase of 0.60 cm among the 10 percent least exposed to greenness, compared to 0.43 cm among the 10 percent most exposed. A modest but yet statistically significant association was observed for the waist-hip ratio, but no significant association was found between NDVI and change in BMI. Using the 100 m and 250 m buffers generated less clear associations than for 500 m.
Conclusions: Our findings suggest a beneficial impact of surrounding greenness on waist circumference and waist-hip ratio. The absence of a statistically significant relationship between NDVI and BMI suggests that the effect of NDVI may be mediated by the cortisol-induced differences in body fat distribution.