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2017 Conference

Abstract Number: 965 | ID: 2017-965

Center for Children’s Health, the Environment, Microbiome, and Metabolomics (C-CHEM2): Project 1- Characterizing Exposures in an Urban Environment (CHERUB) Study Preliminary Results

P. Barry Ryan(Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University,United States, bryan@emory.edu), Dana Boyd Barr(Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, United States), Anne L. Dunlop(Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, United States), Linda A. McCauley(Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, United States)
bryan@emory.edu), Dana Boyd Barr(Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, United States), Anne L. Dunlop(Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, United States), Linda A. McCauley(Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, United States)
Background/Aim: Emory University’s Center for Children’s Health the Environment, Microbiome, and Metabolomics (C-CHEM2) is a multi-component investigation designed to evaluate environmental exposures influencing the infant microbiome and leading to neurodevelopmental sequelae in a population of African-American mothers.
Methods: In the first phase we have collected environmental and biological data on toxicant exposures from samples collected at prenatal and home visits. C-CHEM2’s first project, Characterizing Exposures in an Urban Environment, is designed to validate protocols for office and field sampling and determine the relationship between environmental media concentrations and biomarkers relevant to the microbiome of infants. Environmental and biological samples are taken from mothers during pregnancy and in-home environmental samples, prior to delivery. These samples will be analyzed for parabens, phthalates, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, organophosphate insecticides, pyrethroid insecticides, air pollutants (PAHs), and brominated flame retardants or appropriate metabolites.
Results: Presently, we have collected 151 first hospital visit and 93 second hospital visit urines from expectant mothers and followed that up with home visits gathering 67 urine sample, 105 dust samples, and 25 home air samples. Analysis has been completed for some of the analytes and is continuing for others. Further, recruitment continues with an ultimate target of 300 participating women and approximately 100 individual homes each monitored several times. Currently we have completed approximately one-third of the projected first home visits and begun second home visits on early recruits.
Conclusions: Results for bisphenol A and related compounds indicating that this populations shows concentrations higher than the national average as measured in NHANES investigations and also higher than the African-American sub-population from the same investigations. Analysis continues correlating results from other measures on environmental exposure and biomarkers of such exposure.